[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1621725875397{padding-right: 15px !important;}" z_index=""][vc_column offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_column_text] Achkan, Shervani and Choga: In our last blog, we spoke of the history of the Angrakha and the Jama.  Today, we will continue with three other classic silhouettes worn by men in India, two of which are still worn on formal occasions.  The Achkan is so popular that an Indian wedding is unthinkable without the groom and several guests wearing it.  I remember when my sister was married, I cut up one of my Benares brocade sarees to make a miniature version of Achkan for my then seven-year-old son, something I now regret considering he wore it just once.  

The Achkan :Achkan, Shervani and Choga- The Indian Silhouettes

[caption id="attachment_4124" align="alignleft" width="270"] Portrait of Pratap Singh Maharaja Nabha, by Alfred Thomson[/caption]

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1601061701764{padding-right: 15px !important;}" z_index=""][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1601056653257{padding-right: 15px !important;}" offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_column_text]Muslin- The word ‘Muslin’ is believed to derive from Marco Polo’s description of the cotton trade in Mosul, Iraq. Another view is that of fashion historian Susan Greene, who wrote that the name arose in the 18th century from mousse, the French word for “foam.” The word is most likely derived from the port of Machilipatnam, called Masulipatnam earlier, from where muslin was exported to South Asia, the Roman Empire, Ethiopia, and Egypt, where it was famously used to wrap mummies.  It was often traded for ivory and rhinoceros horn by Greek and Arab merchants. 

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1600543716350{padding-right: 15px !important;}" z_index=""][vc_column offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_column_text]The French Art Deco textile movement has been one of the most modern, artistic, and inventive textiles genres.  So painterly was it that Raoul Dufy said about it, "Paintings have spilled out from their frames on to our clothes and our walls." To understand Art Deco textiles, we must look at the movement and its background as a whole.  The early 20th century was a period of intense intellectual adventure and rebellion, reflected in the arts.  Cubism and Fauvism both flourished at this time.  Designers experimented across genres: painters designed fabrics, and architects worked with furniture. 

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1597860824004{padding-right: 15px !important;}" z_index=""][vc_column offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_single_image image="2315" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]The Story of Indian Cotton: As we enter the sixth month of the pandemic I sit in disbelief, bewildered at the might of the virus- something that has incredible power but molecularly so small. This destructive virus almost feels like prescience as I consecutively write about how mankind has manipulated the existence of indigenous cottonseed, another ‘small’ yet ‘mighty’ being of nature. 

The Discovery of Indian Cotton

How[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1586917017097{border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;padding-right: 40px !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}" z_index=""][vc_column offset="vc_col-xs-12"][vc_column_text]Marking an Embroidery Pattern   Marking an Embroidery Pattern. Oftentimes, in the craft sector, the practitioners feel a sense of responsibility to pursue traditional processes to a Tee. When technology integrates into traditional handcrafts. It saves time and increases efficiency. And it is the best chance to ensure the survival of an ancient practice in a modern world.  Therefore, technology interventions combined with handcrafts can save time and increase efficiency.
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